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Resume format in Canada

Resume format in Canada

The resume format in Canada is quite different from CVs and resumes you may be used to writing in other countries.

What’s different about the resume format in Canada?

Your resume is key to finding jobs in Canada. Employers will generally assess your suitability for roles based on this document alone.

Your sole objective in writing a resume is to pique the reader’s interest so that you get an interview. Shift the focus away from telling the employer everything about yourself. Instead, focus on things that will make them believe you can help their company. Avoid simply listing your duties in each role. Instead, refer to achievements that other candidates wouldn’t be able to put on their resume. Differentiate yourself from the crowd.

The resume format in Canada must contain (in this order):

1. Contact information
2. Professional / career summary
3. Work experience
4. Education / professional development

Where appropriate, you may also add technical skills and volunteer experience / community involvement.

16 tips to adapt to the resume format in Canada

1. Your resume is a tool to secure an interview. It’s not intended to be a thorough work history document. When you write a resume for Canada, concentrate on presenting the reader with your highlights, not every detail. The interview is the time to go into detail.

2. Keep your resume interesting. Typically, hiring managers will only spend 10-30 seconds browsing your document. Use the resume format in Canada to sell yourself in a concise way that focuses on your achievements.

3. Use a professional resume template. 

 4. Avoid long paragraphs and small fonts (less than size 10 is not a good idea). Use an easily readable font and make sure that only one font is used throughout. Ensure your resume format style is consistent.

5. Do not use the first person (e.g. “I am technical”, “I worked at XYZ”). Use short sentences (e.g. “Increased sales by 10%”).

6. The resume format in Canada means your document should typically be a maximum of two pages. If you do not have a lot of experience, then one page should suffice. If you have 10+ years of experience, then three pages may be acceptable.

7. Don’t waste valuable space. Only list experience relevant for the role to which you are applying.

8. Convert all terms to the Canadian equivalent. For example, use terms like “high school”, “GPA” (Grade Point Average — the equivalent for university grades), “internship”, etc.

The beat way to get a job in Canada? – Adil Awdah

16 tips to adapt to the resume format in Canada

9. Do not list personal interests or hobbies unless they are achievements that add to your character. Remember: a good resume sets you apart from other candidates. Mentioning that you like football, play piano, and enjoy the cinema is not likely to boost your chances of success.

10. Include skills such as being able to speak a second language or mastery of particular computer applications. Ensure you only include those that may be relevant to the job you’re applying for.

11. Avoid sending a generic resume to dozens of employers. Your time is better spent being selective and tailoring your resume for each specific job and company you’re applying to.

12. Use a nice resume format, and where possible, have it proofread by an expert in the field. Grammatical and spelling errors on a resume can harm your first impression.

13. Do not list that you are on a “gap year” or “one-year work permit”. Companies want to employ committed candidates who are going to contribute to their success. In an interview, you can discuss your immigration status if the employer requests more information. If you are in Canada on a temporary permit, research longer-term permanent residence options so you can discuss ways of potentially staying in Canada once your work permit expires.

14. Do not include the word ‘resume’ or ‘CV’ at the top of the page, or the date you prepared the document.

15. Do not sign your resume.

16. Do not list references, or include the line ‘references available on request’. It will be assumed that you have these ready, so don’t waste valuable space on your resume by stating this. Have references’ names and contact details ready to present when requested, and make sure they’re willing to speak positively on your behalf.

Preparing for the resume format in Canada

  • Do not list your date of birth, gender, marital status, religion, or parents’ names. It’s not required under the employment law in Canada, and is not a necessary part of the resume format in Canada.
  • Where possible, ensure you have a Canadian address listed. More importantly, include a Canadian cell phone number.
  • Ensure that you have an email address that looks professional. It should include a combination of your first name and last name, and avoid slang terms or nicknames. Avoid using email addresses with country-specific domains, like .co.uk, or .co.in. If necessary, set up a new email address for your job hunt.
  • Add your LinkedIn profile URL. Create a custom LinkedIn profile URL so that it isn’t as ‘clunky’ as the one that LinkedIn designated for you. You want to make it as easy as possible for the employer to find your profile, particularly when viewing a printed version of your resume. Also, ensure it’s up to date and that your profile contains a strong summary.
Professional / career summary

This is a micro resume that will allow the reader to understand your goals and how you can help their company.

Three or four short sentences will suffice to set the tone for the detail that follows. Outline what makes you different, whether it is personality, technical ability, managerial skills, team building, or some other talents.

Begin by stating your objective clearly. You should list the title of the role you want to target — if you’re responding to a job posting, this role will be the job you’re applying for. Being a “jack of all trades” is not a good thing for an employer. If you want to be a Project Manager, then call yourself a Project Manager. Don’t expect a company to identify what you should be.

If you would like to do two or three different things, then build two or three specific documents, and follow the resume format in Canada in each. Listing “Marketing / Admin / Finance Professional” is not attractive, so have a clear focus for the relevant job application.

  • Mention how many years of relevant experience you have, what type of experience this is, and your future ambitions.
  • Avoid generic comments (e.g. “honest and hardworking professional”). Instead, give the reader a true insight into your strengths and objectives (e.g. “able to continually identify cost savings and efficiencies, and routinely trusted to manage projects effectively, mentor junior colleagues, and solve problems”). These should be specific to you, and not things that anyone can write on their resume.
  • Mention your career aspirations, whether this is professional designations, supervisory work, managerial work, or other work.
Work experience in Canada

Include details of relevant roles. Prospective employers will already be familiar with the duties and responsibilities of these roles, so there’s no need to list them.

Use three or four concise bullet points instead of long lists.

Think about key achievements in each previous role, then build each point by highlighting a specific problem you encountered, actions taken, and results accomplished. Every successful problem solved brings either an increase in revenue or decrease in costs. This is how managers think, so speak their language.

Problem/Situation >> Action taken >> Results/Achievement

Problem/Situation: Every action that you take in a job is for a reason. Who asked you to perform this task? What was the objective? What was the background behind the task or the problem you set out to solve? Identify what the problem or situation was that prompted the action.

Action taken: This is where you incorporate the duties that you took to resolve a problem or situation.

Results/Achievement: Some questions to think about: What would happen if you didn’t perform this task as well? What was the impact of doing the task well? Did you gain recognition for this work? Did it improve efficiency, increase sales, reduce costs, or all of the above? Where possible, try to quantify the result in terms of either a percentage or Canadian dollar value.

Source : Moving2Canada

How to tailor your resume to any job posting?

tailor your resume

How to tailor your resume to any job posting?

Hiring managers may sort through hundreds of resumes for a single job, meaning they often scan to find the most relevant details.

The best way to get noticed as a candidate is to tailor your resume to the employer’s job description.

To do this, you need to showcase your most relevant qualifications using their keywords and specific phrases.

In this article, we explain why you should be tailoring your resume to job descriptions and provide steps and an example to help you get started

What is tailor your resume?

When an employer posts a job opening, they include a list of responsibilities and required (or preferred) qualifications.

You will take those qualifications and add the same language or keywords throughout your resume to show you can fulfill the role.

A tailored resume proves that you have the skills the employer is seeking and have previously used them to create optimal results at work

Benefits of tailor your resume

Providing a tailored resume can help you stand out amongst other applicants and improve your chances of getting an interview.

Here are a few reasons why:

It demonstrates your alignment with the job.

When looking at your resume, hiring managers are most concerned about how well you fit the job requirements.

By focusing on your most relevant experiences and skills, you demonstrate a proven record of performing similar responsibilities.

It proves your interest.

Tailoring your resume can display genuine enthusiasm for the job because you took the extra time and effort to ensure it showcases your best-fit qualifications.

Hiring managers will appreciate this thoughtfulness and feel more excited about a candidate who seems eager to work for them.

It emphasizes the employer’s needs.

Hiring managers want to see how a candidate would support their goals. Focusing on your most applicable skills and relevant accomplishments

shows them that you are considering their needs, not just what the job can do for you.

It can help you pass applicant tracking systems.

Many of today’s hiring managers use these tools to filter through resumes using keywords from the job description.

Tailoring your resume using the job description will improve your chances of having your resume read

How to tailor your resume

You can use the following steps to create a more compelling resume by tailoring it to job descriptions:

1. Review the job description.

First, you need to understand what the employer wants and the qualifications required to perform the job.

Read its description and write down or highlight any significant keywords related to skills.

These may be words or phrases that seem unique to the job or reoccur throughout the posting.

Then take note of specific requirements, such as necessary education or training and years of experience.

Also, look at the order of the responsibilities listed, as those mentioned first may be more of a priority for the employer.

You will want to mirror the employer’s priorities when organizing your resume

the first items they mention should be some of the first items you mention.

2. Compare your resume.

Now that you know what the employer is seeking from candidates,

you can review your general resume to start tailor your resume to their needs.

Place your key qualifications in the top half of the page using your summary and experience sections,

which will ensure that the hiring manager sees that you fit the role right away.

Look at the experiences already listed on your resume and determine which previous roles are most relevant.

If they are your most recent jobs, use a reverse-chronological format. However, you may want to use a functional or combination format

if your most relevant job was further back in your history.

With those formats, you can steer the focus toward your most relevant skills rather than your work timeline

3. Update your summary.

The summary section will be at the top of your resume, so it is one of the first things a hiring manager sees.

If you have one, use it to showcase your most relevant skills and accomplishments based on the keywords you highlighted.

You should also include the title of the job to which you are applying, proving that this is a personalized resume.

For example, say you were applying for a social media marketing position seeking candidates that take the initiative on projects,

have at least two years of experience and are proficient in web marketing and SEO.

Your summary might look like this:

Self-motivated social media marketing specialist with over three years of experience in web marketing and social media campaign management. Developed SEO strategies for clients that increased organic traffic,

 including a 25% boost for a local restaurant group.

4. Customize your work history.

Your work history is the next most visible section on tailor your resume, so the hiring manager should immediately be able to tell that you have relevant experience.

If you have a long work history, this may mean you need to minimize or remove any positions that do not align.

Or if your most relevant jobs were further back, you may split this section into two for further tailoring: an “[industry] experience” section and an “Other work experience” section.

The bulleted lists under each position should always utilize the job description’s keywords.

This specific language shows that you will start the job with the required skills and experience.

Keep in mind that your first bullet points should represent the most relevant responsibilities or tasks.

For example, if the description emphasizes leadership abilities,

Start each list with examples of how you led a team, trained peers or other similar tasks.

Even if those were not your main responsibilities, those responsibilities best match what the hiring manager wants.

5. Include measurable results.

To further prove yourself as a qualified candidate, use quantifiable data in your experience section.

If you do not already have numbers in your bulleted list, determine where you can add them to demonstrate your impact at previous companies.

Hiring managers will be impressed by such achievements because they present the value you provide.

An example of a compelling achievement would be: “developed an email marketing campaign that increased monthly sales by 10%.”

Hiring managers will be more interested to see your specific results, rather than a sentence such as “created successful marketing campaigns.”

Here, they do not get details on how significant of an impact you made on your clients.

6. Update your skills section.

Your summary and work history may not include all the most relevant skills you have, so add any remaining to your skills section.

Like those sections, list the employer’s most prioritized skills first using exact keywords from the job description.

Examples may include proficiency in specific technologies or technical and soft skills.

Next, include any other relevant skills that showcase the unique value you bring to the role.

Be sure to include any “preferred” skills as these may be optional but can help set you apart as a top candidate.

7. Proofread your resume.

Beyond grammatical and spelling errors, review your resume to ensure you used the employer’s keywords and phrases.

You should compare your summary section to the overall job description and evaluate whether they match.

Next, ensure that each bullet point in your work history is relevant to the job’s responsibilities and requirements.

You can also ask a friend or colleague to review it and provide feedback on whether they see alignment.

Aside from passing potential applicant tracking systems, you want to ensure that your language is specific enough to catch the hiring manager’s attention. Seeing familiar words or phrases will demonstrate that you understand their needs and can execute the job’s responsibilities.

Tailored resume example

You can use the following example as a guide for tailoring your resume.

Consider this sample job description:

Job: Sales manager

Job description: Saul’s Supplies provides shipping and business supplies to companies across the Southeast.

As a sales manager, you will use your expertise to support our sales team to deliver products to our customers, enabling them to achieve their business goals.

Responsibilities:

  • Manage and mentor a team of 10-12 sales representatives, oversee their sales activities.
  • Collaborate with training manager to implement training procedures and ensure compliance.
  • Design and implement successful sales strategies.
  • Prepare sales budgets and projections.
  • Identify new business and customer opportunities.
  • Track and analyze sales goals based on key metrics.
  • Manage and solve customer complaints.

Minimum requirements:

  • Bachelor’s degree in sales, marketing or related field
  • At least five years of experience working in sales management
  • Proven record of planning sales campaigns and managing sales activities
  • Strong interpersonal and communication (written and oral) skills
  • Ability to set and achieve sales goals
  • Ability to train, lead and motivate sales team members

Here is a sample of a tailored resume that uses keywords from the job description:

Enthusiastic and results-driven sales manager with over five years of experience leading local sales teams.

Seeking to bring my proven track record of creating and implementing successful strategies

to increase sales while attracting and retaining customers to Saul’s Supplies in a regional manager role.

Professional experience

Sales Manager (October 2014-Present)

  • Responsible for leading and motivating a team of eight to 10 sales representatives and ensuring they meet quarterly sales goals.
  • Established sales objectives through forecasting and developed annual sales budgets accordingly.
  • Utilized representatives’ feedback to build enthusiasm and develop training procedures that reduced employee turnover by 25%.
  • Developed customer acquisition strategies that increased sales by an average of 15% each year.

Sales Representative (May 2011-October 2014)

  • Assisted manager to train over 40 new hires following company procedures.
  • Increased number of customer leads by 28% through email marketing campaigns and cold calling.
  • Met or exceeded 95% of my quarterly sales goals during employment.
  • Provided excellent customer service over the phone, including handling complaints and assisting with purchases.

Education

Bachelor of Arts in Marketing — Michigan State University

Source : indeed

Rights as a worker in Canada

Canada

If you’re working in Canada, your Rights as a worker in Canada are protected by law. The vast majority of Canadian employers comply with the rules and provide positive and safe workplace environments. Unfortunately, this is not always the case, so it is crucial to know what you can expect from employers, and how to make sure you are treated well in the workplace.

Most employees are protected by provincial law, but some industries are federally-regulated

Your labor rights in Canada

Each province and territory has its own Human Rights Act or Code, which governs employment rights in the province. These rights and standards are largely the same across Canada – the Canadian Centre for Diversity and Inclusion provides a detailed comparison. 

To cut out the legalese, the basic thing you need to know is this: you have rights in the workplace, and there are mechanisms to help you if your rights are abused.

Your rights on the job in Canada

Throughout your career, you’ll benefit from certain rights as a worker in Canada relating to pay, schedule, sickness or holiday leave, and other aspects of working life. Overall these are fairly similar across the country, although there can be slight differences between provinces. 

One key takeaway that applies across the country is the number of hours in a workweek. A working day is usually considered to be eight hours long (this may include an unpaid break). Over a five-day workweek, this means that most full-time workers clock around 35 to 40 hours. However, working anywhere from 30 to 40 hours per week is usually considered full-time employment, for the purposes of benefits and deductions calculations (for example, even if you work 30 hours a week, you could be eligible for the benefits and deductions applicable to a full-time employee).

If you work more than 40 hours a week, you should usually be entitled to overtime pay. This can vary by position and industry, so check the provincial advice pages linked below. When in doubt, it is always appropriate to ask about these details in a job interview or when you are hired.

The conditions for vacation pay vary between provinces, but again the basics are the same: employees earn vacation pay at a rate of four percent, which equates to two weeks’ vacation per year if you’re working full-time (this usually goes up to six percent and three weeks’ vacation after a number of years with the same employer). However, it is important to note that every employee earns vacation pay on their earnings: if you are employed part-time, you also have a right to vacation pay equalling four percent of your earnings.

Every province and territory also has its own conditions for “job-protected” or authorized leaves, such as sick days, bereavement leaves, and maternity/paternity leave. The conditions and entitlements vary, but the underlying concept is the same: wherever you work in Canada, there are ways for you to take the time off that you need, during which your job is protected. That is, if the absence meets the conditions set out in the province or territory’s labor standards, your employer cannot fire you and must let you return to work if you wish to.

Statutory holidays in Canada

Several statutory, or “bank”, holidays are celebrated across Canada, and employees get these days off in addition to their vacation time. Adding to statutory holidays, there are also provincial holidays.

If a holiday falls during your scheduled vacation, you still get it as an additional vacation day (for example, if you take five business days off work over the July 1 weekend, you would use up only four days of your vacation time). If you are required to work on a recognized holiday, overtime wages may apply – the way this is calculated can vary by province, so check their pages for more information.

Rights as a worker in Canada should be ensured for everyone, and this is the case for the overwhelming majority of people, but it always helps to know your rights.

source: moving2canada

If you have any more queries, you can ask your question in the forum of Canadians Live.

Credential assessment in Canada

Canada

You’ll need a Credential assessment if you:

  • immigrate to Canada as a Federal Skilled Worker
  • come to Canada to work in a certain profession or trade
  • come to Canada to study

Credentials you got outside Canada will need to be assessed, such as:

  • education
  • work experience
  • professional credentials

Having your credentials assessed will help you:

  • show employers what you are qualified for
  • understand the types of jobs for you might be qualified for
  • see if your credentials are equal to the standards set for Canadian workers
  • find out if you need more training, education or Canadian work experience

You can start the process to get your credentials assessed and recognized before you arrive in Canada. This takes time and costs money.

To immigrate as a Federal Skilled Worker (FSW)

To apply to the Federal Skilled Worker Program (FSWP), you must get Educational Credential Assessments (ECAs). This includes any of your completed foreign educational credentials, such as a:

  • diploma
  • certificate
  • foreign degree
  • other proof of your Credential assessment

We use ECAs to see if your credentials are valid and equal to a completed credential in Canada.

You’ll also need to have your skills and training assessed to work in certain jobs in Canada.

source: canada.ca

If you have any more queries, you can ask your question in the forum of Canadians Live.

How can I come to Canada as a skilled worker?

Canada

The Federal Skilled Worker (FSW) program is for people who are selected to immigrate to Canada because of their work experience and skills.

Important Note: As of January, 1, 2015 candidates for the Federal Skilled Worker Program will be selected to apply through the Express Entry System. If you have applied before January 1, 2015, your application will be considered according to the former system.

To be eligible to apply, you must:

  • Have a job offer; or
  • Be eligible to work in Canada; or
  • Be able to prove that you have enough money to support yourself and your dependants after you arrive in Canada;

and Have at least 1 year of full-time (or equivalent) skilled work experience; Meet minimum language levels in English or French; Have a post-secondary certificate, diploma or degree; Plan to live outside the province of Quebec. 

What kind of work experience do I need?

Your work experience must be either Skill Type 0Skill Level A or Skill Level B on the Canadian National Occupational Classification (NOC).

Your work experience must be paidfull-time or the equivalent hours part-time. Full-time means at least 30 hours per week. You must have had that work experience during the last 10 years.

These limits do not apply if you have a permanent job offer.

source : settlement

How do I come to Canada as a temporary foreign worker?

Canada

To come to Canada as a temporary foreign worker, you must get a work permit. There are different kinds of work permits.

If you are not a Canadian citizen or permanent resident, you need a work permit to work legally in Canada.

In general, you need to apply for a work permit from Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) or a Canadian visa office before you come to Canada. For these work permits:

  • You need to get a job offer from a Canadian employer before you apply.
  • The employer must apply for a Labour Market Impact Assessment (LMIA) from Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC).
  • ESDC will decide whether the employer can hire a foreign worker to fill the job.

There are special work permits for some kinds of workers. For example, there are special work permit programs for caregivers, business people and agricultural workers.

For more information, go to Working Temporarily in Canada on the IRCC website.

If You Are in Canada

If you are already in Canada, you may be eligible to apply for a special type of work permit.

Work Permits are Temporary

You cannot use a work permit to immigrate to Canada. If you want to come to Canada as a permanent resident based on your work skills and experience, see if you qualify to apply as a skilled worker.

Can I become a permanent resident?

Temporary foreign workers can apply for permanent residence under these programs:

  • Canadian Experience Class (CEC)
  • Opportunities Ontario: Provincial Nominee Program (PNP)
  • Caregiver Program – Note: There are changes coming to the Caregiver program in 2019.

You must meet eligibility requirements to apply for these programs.

You can also apply as a skilled worker, but there is no special category within the skilled worker class for temporary foreign workers.

source : settlement