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Resume format in Canada

Resume format in Canada

The resume format in Canada is quite different from CVs and resumes you may be used to writing in other countries.

What’s different about the resume format in Canada?

Your resume is key to finding jobs in Canada. Employers will generally assess your suitability for roles based on this document alone.

Your sole objective in writing a resume is to pique the reader’s interest so that you get an interview. Shift the focus away from telling the employer everything about yourself. Instead, focus on things that will make them believe you can help their company. Avoid simply listing your duties in each role. Instead, refer to achievements that other candidates wouldn’t be able to put on their resume. Differentiate yourself from the crowd.

The resume format in Canada must contain (in this order):

1. Contact information
2. Professional / career summary
3. Work experience
4. Education / professional development

Where appropriate, you may also add technical skills and volunteer experience / community involvement.

16 tips to adapt to the resume format in Canada

1. Your resume is a tool to secure an interview. It’s not intended to be a thorough work history document. When you write a resume for Canada, concentrate on presenting the reader with your highlights, not every detail. The interview is the time to go into detail.

2. Keep your resume interesting. Typically, hiring managers will only spend 10-30 seconds browsing your document. Use the resume format in Canada to sell yourself in a concise way that focuses on your achievements.

3. Use a professional resume template. 

 4. Avoid long paragraphs and small fonts (less than size 10 is not a good idea). Use an easily readable font and make sure that only one font is used throughout. Ensure your resume format style is consistent.

5. Do not use the first person (e.g. “I am technical”, “I worked at XYZ”). Use short sentences (e.g. “Increased sales by 10%”).

6. The resume format in Canada means your document should typically be a maximum of two pages. If you do not have a lot of experience, then one page should suffice. If you have 10+ years of experience, then three pages may be acceptable.

7. Don’t waste valuable space. Only list experience relevant for the role to which you are applying.

8. Convert all terms to the Canadian equivalent. For example, use terms like “high school”, “GPA” (Grade Point Average — the equivalent for university grades), “internship”, etc.

The beat way to get a job in Canada? – Adil Awdah

16 tips to adapt to the resume format in Canada

9. Do not list personal interests or hobbies unless they are achievements that add to your character. Remember: a good resume sets you apart from other candidates. Mentioning that you like football, play piano, and enjoy the cinema is not likely to boost your chances of success.

10. Include skills such as being able to speak a second language or mastery of particular computer applications. Ensure you only include those that may be relevant to the job you’re applying for.

11. Avoid sending a generic resume to dozens of employers. Your time is better spent being selective and tailoring your resume for each specific job and company you’re applying to.

12. Use a nice resume format, and where possible, have it proofread by an expert in the field. Grammatical and spelling errors on a resume can harm your first impression.

13. Do not list that you are on a “gap year” or “one-year work permit”. Companies want to employ committed candidates who are going to contribute to their success. In an interview, you can discuss your immigration status if the employer requests more information. If you are in Canada on a temporary permit, research longer-term permanent residence options so you can discuss ways of potentially staying in Canada once your work permit expires.

14. Do not include the word ‘resume’ or ‘CV’ at the top of the page, or the date you prepared the document.

15. Do not sign your resume.

16. Do not list references, or include the line ‘references available on request’. It will be assumed that you have these ready, so don’t waste valuable space on your resume by stating this. Have references’ names and contact details ready to present when requested, and make sure they’re willing to speak positively on your behalf.

Preparing for the resume format in Canada

  • Do not list your date of birth, gender, marital status, religion, or parents’ names. It’s not required under the employment law in Canada, and is not a necessary part of the resume format in Canada.
  • Where possible, ensure you have a Canadian address listed. More importantly, include a Canadian cell phone number.
  • Ensure that you have an email address that looks professional. It should include a combination of your first name and last name, and avoid slang terms or nicknames. Avoid using email addresses with country-specific domains, like .co.uk, or .co.in. If necessary, set up a new email address for your job hunt.
  • Add your LinkedIn profile URL. Create a custom LinkedIn profile URL so that it isn’t as ‘clunky’ as the one that LinkedIn designated for you. You want to make it as easy as possible for the employer to find your profile, particularly when viewing a printed version of your resume. Also, ensure it’s up to date and that your profile contains a strong summary.
Professional / career summary

This is a micro resume that will allow the reader to understand your goals and how you can help their company.

Three or four short sentences will suffice to set the tone for the detail that follows. Outline what makes you different, whether it is personality, technical ability, managerial skills, team building, or some other talents.

Begin by stating your objective clearly. You should list the title of the role you want to target — if you’re responding to a job posting, this role will be the job you’re applying for. Being a “jack of all trades” is not a good thing for an employer. If you want to be a Project Manager, then call yourself a Project Manager. Don’t expect a company to identify what you should be.

If you would like to do two or three different things, then build two or three specific documents, and follow the resume format in Canada in each. Listing “Marketing / Admin / Finance Professional” is not attractive, so have a clear focus for the relevant job application.

  • Mention how many years of relevant experience you have, what type of experience this is, and your future ambitions.
  • Avoid generic comments (e.g. “honest and hardworking professional”). Instead, give the reader a true insight into your strengths and objectives (e.g. “able to continually identify cost savings and efficiencies, and routinely trusted to manage projects effectively, mentor junior colleagues, and solve problems”). These should be specific to you, and not things that anyone can write on their resume.
  • Mention your career aspirations, whether this is professional designations, supervisory work, managerial work, or other work.
Work experience in Canada

Include details of relevant roles. Prospective employers will already be familiar with the duties and responsibilities of these roles, so there’s no need to list them.

Use three or four concise bullet points instead of long lists.

Think about key achievements in each previous role, then build each point by highlighting a specific problem you encountered, actions taken, and results accomplished. Every successful problem solved brings either an increase in revenue or decrease in costs. This is how managers think, so speak their language.

Problem/Situation >> Action taken >> Results/Achievement

Problem/Situation: Every action that you take in a job is for a reason. Who asked you to perform this task? What was the objective? What was the background behind the task or the problem you set out to solve? Identify what the problem or situation was that prompted the action.

Action taken: This is where you incorporate the duties that you took to resolve a problem or situation.

Results/Achievement: Some questions to think about: What would happen if you didn’t perform this task as well? What was the impact of doing the task well? Did you gain recognition for this work? Did it improve efficiency, increase sales, reduce costs, or all of the above? Where possible, try to quantify the result in terms of either a percentage or Canadian dollar value.

Source : Moving2Canada

6 tips before you start your new life Canada

start your new life Canada

6 tips before you start your new life Canada

Here are our tips to help you wrap up your life back home before your new life in Canada.

You should also take a look at this essential checklist for things you can do pre-departure that will give you a head-start in your new life in Canada.

We also highly recommend you keep up-to-date with latest immigration developments – as anyone will tell you, changes happen regularly that can affect your move.

Selling your car? Put the wheels in motion early

Up to four months before leaving

You’re probably going to want to sell your car for the highest price possible. 

Every extra dollar is another opportunity to have fun when you’re travelling.

To do this, you’re going to need to attempt to sell it as early as possible.

Allow a few months if you can, to give yourself every opportunity to get a good price for it.

You can always slowly lower it as your departure becomes closer.

Remember: the only way you’ll sell it quickly is by selling it for way less than it’s worth. Try to avoid putting yourself in this situation

Get rid of your things gradually to avoid stress

Up to three months before leaving

Have lots of clothes you won’t be taking with you?

Can’t find a family member to mind your 42-inch TV?

Don’t leave getting rid of all of this until the last minute. 

It can sometimes take a few attempts to get a stall at a flea market to sell your clothes, accessories and DVDs.

It can also take time to find a genuine buyer for your goods online.

Ignacio, on our Facebook page, writes:

“Don’t be afraid to get rid of tons of useless stuff – 95pc of what we own is disposable. The rest can be given to friends or put in a storeroom. When I came back, I realised most of what I kept was just as useless as what I had thrown away. I blame nostalgia.”

Put aside some time each weekend to tend to all of this.

Not only will it ease the number of cars you’ll fill when you eventually have to pack up and move out of your home, but your bank balance will hopefully be much better off for it too

Ask for your tax forms

30 days before leaving

Gather any tax forms relating to the termination of your employment.

This will prove useful if you’ve overpaid income tax and need to claim this back at the end of the tax year.

For example, an employee who’s paid monthly may have had their annual tax credit divided by 12 and had this amount deducted from their tax liability each month.

So if this employee left their job in July, they may have overpaid tax as five months of their tax credits were never applied.

Having these tax forms organised and in your luggage will make claiming back over-payments much easier, when the end of the tax year comes around.

You should also call your local tax authority, or consult a professional accountant, before your departure to discuss any questions you might have relating to your specific circumstance. It’s easier to do this while at home than from Canada

Cancel subscriptions – all of them!

30 days before leaving

You’ll likely cancel the obvious utilities, like electricity and gas, and your internet and TV subscriptions. That part is easy. 

Do bear in mind though that some of these will require advance notice, such as 30 days.

Are you as likely to remember the smaller subscriptions, like the annual charge for your local public bike scheme? Possibly not.

It’s a good idea to go through your bank statements and look carefully for any subscriptions you may have overlooked.

If you’re keeping your home bank account open, the last thing you want is to check in out of curiosity six months into your trip, and discover you’ve been running a costly overdraft for services you haven’t been using

Sort out your mobile phone for your new life in Canada

20 days before leaving

If you’re on contract with your mobile phone operator, you may need to give them 30 days of notice that you intend to cancel.

Consider allowing ten days or so to get yourself set up in Canada with a bank account and a mobile phone, as you may need to have a bank account sorted to set up a direct debit to get the phone.

Look into what roaming offers your home provider can give you for your new life in Canada.

Also – if your phone needs to be unblocked by your network, bear in mind that this can take around ten days.

To save yourself the hassle of potential follow-up calls from abroad, arrange this while you’re calling them 20 days before you leave.

If you’ve an old phone lying around, bring this with you so you can put your home SIM into it and check for messages periodically without having to take SIMs in and out of your main phone

Redirect your post

Seven days before leaving

Make arrangements so that essential mail isn’t missed.

If you’ve overlooked some utilities, if there are issues with your tax, or if your bank needs to contact you, it’s likely they’ll use the postal service to do so.

If friends or family are taking over your rented accommodation, ask them to keep an eye out for any letters that may arrive for you.

Alternatively, you may want to consider postal redirection. Your local postal service can arrange this for you, usually for a fee.

For any utilities that you’ll be keeping while you’re abroad, for example your home bank account, make sure you update your address to one of a trusted friend or family member.

Source: moving2canada

Express Entry Canada Immigration

Express Entry Canada

Express Entry Canada Immigration | Eligibility Requirements

It is is the fastest and most popular pathway for newcomers seeking a new life in Canada.

Express Entry organizes and processes applications for people who wish to immigrate to Canada and acquire

How can I apply for Express Entry?

Applying to Express Entry Canada is a two-step process. 

The first step is to submit your profile which requires the following documents:

  • Language test results
  • Educational credential assessment report
  • A passport or travel document

After you submit your profile and you receive an invitation to apply for Canadian permanent residence,

you will need to provide a more substantial application that includes reference letters, additional identity documents,

police clearance certificates, and results of a medical examination

Candidates with university or college degrees with skilled work experience and moderate proficiency in English and/or French are ideal candidates. 

Candidates who qualify for the following programs

are also eligible to submit an application under the Express Entry program:

The easiest way to find out if your eligible is to use free online assessment tool

What are the requirements for Express Entry?

In general,

to be eligible to apply to Express Entry as a skilled worker,

you must:

1- Have at least one year, in the last 10 years, of continuous full-time

(or equivalent part-time) work experience in a skilled occupation

2- Be able to demonstrate on an approved language test a minimum of Canadian Language Benchmark (CLB) 

seven in either English or French

3- Completed post-secondary education that is assessed against Canadian standards

with an Educational Credential Assessment

Meeting these requirements doesn’t mean you will receive an invitation to apply for Canadian permanent residence. Candidates with stronger profiles will always be selected over candidates that simply meet the minimum requirement. 

What is the ideal Express Entry candidate?

On the other hand There is no one-size-fits-all type of profile that is eligible for Express Entry.

 Candidates who enter the pool receive a comprehensive ranking system (CRS) score.

Those who rank higher are more likely to receive an invitation to apply.

Selection factors that can influence your CRS score are language proficiency, your age, your level of work experience, education, and Canadian connections. 

Ideal Express Entry candidates would meet the following requirements:
  • Firstly, Less than 30 years old 
  •  Secondly, you may gets at least two Bachelor’s or Master’s degrees
  • Thirdly, Be able to demonstrate moderate to high English and/or French language proficiency (Canadian Language Benchmark [CLB] level nine or higher)
  • Moreover, You have at least 3 years of skilled work experience
and most importantly Other factors that can really boost your CRS score can include:
  • Higher language proficiency in English and/or French
  • Bilingualism in French and English
  • A Master’s degree or Ph.D. education
  • Canadian work or educational experience
  • A Canadian brother or sister currently residing in Canada
  • An arranged employment offer from a Canadian company 
  • A nomination from a provincial nominee program
Do I need a job offer for Express Entry?

You do not require a job offer for Express Entry. The vast majority of candidates selected for Express Entry do not have a formal Canadian job offer.

A formal Canadian job offer for a skilled, full-time position can add 50 to 200 points to your Express Entry application.

Almost always, a positive Labour Market Impact Assessment (LMIA) is required for these points to be awarded.  

An informal job offer will not award any additional points to your Express Entry profile and should not be mentioned in the application

How long does Express Entry take?

Express Entry can take as little as six months to process, from submission of the Express Entry profile to the issuance of a permanent resident visa.

However, not all cases will proceed this quickly.

Your Express Entry profile will remain active in the pool of candidates for 12 months if you are not invited to apply.

If after 12 months you have not been selected, you are welcome to resubmit your profile and remain in the pool.

To break it down further:

1- Your profile will remain valid for 12 months in the Express Entry pool 

2- Upon issuance of the ITA, you will have 60 days to provide the requested full application of documents

3- when the immigration authorities received your complete application,

the permanent resident visa will processed in six months or less

Source : canadim

Can I leave Canada after I mail my citizenship application?

canadians live - citizenship

Can I leave Canada after I mail my citizenship application? Yes. You can leave Canada after we receive your citizenship application.

If you need to leave Canada and want to stay eligible for Canadian citizenship, you must:

  • make sure that you live in Canada long enough to keep your Permanent Resident (PR) status
  • be a permanent resident (when you apply)
  • not lose PR status before you take the Oath of Citizenship
  • bring your PR card with you when you leave Canada so you can return it easily

Make sure your PR card won’t expire while you are outside Canada.

We usually only mail letters, notices and other documents to addresses in Canada. In some cases, you may receive an email from us. You must reply to these letters or emails within a specified amount of time. If you don’t reply within the time frame and don’t provide an acceptable reason for not being able to keep your appointment with us or providing requested information, we may stop processing your application.

Source : cicgc

The Canada Experience Class

The Canada Experience Class


Individuals who have worked in Canada and who wish to permanent stability in Canada with their accompanying dependents may qualify to apply for Permanent Residence under the Canadian Experience Class.

Canada Experience Class program recognizes the benefits to Canada by candidates who have spent significant amounts of time pursuing their studies and working careers in Canada.

It recognizes their contributions to the Canadian economy and the creation of strong links to Canadian society.

This strengthens the permanent residence programs to Canada.

Requirements for Canadian Experience Class

Eligibility for permanent residence under this class is assessed on a pass-fail basis where the primary criteria are the following: 

  • The candidate has acquired 12 months of full-time work experience in an occupation categorized as Skill Type 0 or Skill Level A or B of the National Occupation Classification (NOC). Qualifying occupations are those of a managerial, professional, technical or skilled trade nature.
    • The qualifying Canadian work experience was acquired within the 36 months immediately preceding the date of application;
  • The candidate demonstrates sufficient proficiency in one of Canada’s official languages. The level of proficiency required is determined by the occupation in which the candidate gained qualifying Canadian work experience;
  • The candidate is not inadmissible to Canada on medical, criminal or security grounds.

Qualifying work experience

Qualifying work experience must be full time and skilled. “Full-time” refers to 30 hours per week.

Part-time work will be considered, but only on a pro-rata basis. For example, 6 months in a part-time skilled position at 15 hours per week will count as three months towards the required 12. Multiple concurrent part-time jobs can also be used to meet the experience requirement.

Any work experience acquired in Canada without valid work authorization will not be considered. Nor will periods of self-employment or work experience gained while the candidate was enrolled in a program of full-time study.

Language proficiency

Minimum proficiency must be demonstrated in all four language abilities, namely: Reading; writing; speaking; listening. Applicants whose qualifying work experience is in an occupation categorized as NOC Skill Type 0 or Skill Level A must meet Canadian Language Benchmark (CLB) level 7. Applicants whose qualifying work experience is in an occupation categorized as NOC Skill Level B must meet CLB level 5.

Equivalencies between the required level of proficiency in French or English and test results under the International English Language Testing System (IELTS) and the Test d’évaluation de français (TEF) are:

CLB
 Level
IELTS General Training Test Results
     Speaking         Listening            Reading            Writing       
76.06.06.06.0
55.05.04.05.0
CLB
 Level
CELPIP General Test Results 
     Speaking         Listening            Reading            Writing       
77777
55555
CLB
 Level
Test d’évaluation de français (TEF Canada) Test Results
     Speaking         Listening            Reading            Writing       
7310-348249-279207-232310-348
5226-270181-216151-180226-270
CLB
 Level
Test des connaissances de français (TCF Canada) Test Results
     Speaking         Listening            Reading            Writing       
710-11458-502453-49810-11
56369-3976375-405

Conclusion

The Canadian Experience Class is an ideal program for individuals who have become familiar with life in Canada and who wish to resettle here. For qualifying candidates, it is an expedient and secure option for obtaining permanent residence, with objective criteria. Moreover, the application can be made from within Canada, while the candidate has appropriate temporary status.

In short, it allows a seamless transition from temporary to permanent status in Canada.

*The Canadian Experience Class does not apply to foreigners wishing to establish themselves in the Province of Quebec;

however the work experience accumulated in that province is valid to meet the CEC program requirements if the candidate wishes to relocate to another province.

source : immigration.ca

Can immigrants vote in the Canadian election

Can immigrants vote in the Canadian election

A guide to voting in the 2021 election for Canadian citizens anywhere in the world.

Am I eligible to vote?

If you are a Canadian citizen, age 18 or older, you can vote in the 2021 federal election. And if you are out of the country, or simply do not want to go to a polling station on voting day, you can apply to mail in your ballot.

How does Canada’s electoral system work?

In Canada, you vote for one person to be the member of parliament (MP) for your riding. There are 338 ridings. Each one is led by an elected MP. Most times the party that gets the highest number of MPs elected to the House of Commons wins the election, and the leader of that party becomes prime minister.

How do I decide who to vote for?

There are a number of ways to determine which party aligns best with your goals. The Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, for example, offers a Vote Compass, where you can take a quiz to see which parties align with your political views. There are a number of other such quizzes just a search query away.

Canada is currently governed by the Liberal Party of Canada, under Prime Minister Justin Trudeau. The Conservative Party of Canada is the official opposition, meaning they have the second-most seats in the House, and it is led by Erin O’Toole. These are the only two parties to have ever held office at the federal level.

The Bloc Québécois is only present in Quebec and is led by Yves-François Blanchet. It currently has the third most seats in the House of Commons, followed by the New Democratic Party (NDP) led by Jagmeet Singh. The Green Party has the fewest seats in the House, and its leader is Annamie Paul.

How do I vote?

The first step for new voters in Canada is to register to vote. You can register online or in-person at any Elections Canada office. Pre-registration is available until September 14 at 6 p.m. If you register in advance you should get a voter information card in the mail that you can bring with you on election day. You will also need one piece of acceptable ID.

Alternatively, you can show up and register when you go to vote at a polling station. Advance polling dates are from September 10 to 13, from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. local time. Election day is September 20.

Most eligible Canadians are already registered to vote. You can check by going to the Elections Canada website, or calling 1-800-463-6868.

If you are voting by mail you will receive an instruction package to your home address where you will write the name of the MP whom you would like to vote for.

Everyone else will mark an “X” next to one name on the ballot. Voting for more than one candidate, or none at all will spoil the ballot.

Can I vote if I am not in Canada?

Yes, you can vote from outside Canada. You have to register to vote by mail before September 14.

After you are registered, Canada will mail you a voting kit where you can choose the candidate you want to vote for. Elections Canada recommends mailing in the ballot as soon as possible. If your vote comes in after September 20 by law it cannot be counted.

How do I find my polling station?

Your polling station information will be available on your voter information card. This year, polling stations will be fewer and farther between. Since it is a snap election, Elections Canada was not able to set up polling stations at university and college campuses.

source :
cicnews

How to Immigrate to Canada as a Couple

Canada

There are many ways to immigrate to Canada as a couple, from spousal sponsorship to more traditional paths with your spouse joining you as a dependent. Spousal relationships that are considered for Canadian immigration purposes include same-sex couples and common-law partners.    

The spouse, common-law partner or conjugal partner looking to immigrate to Canada under spousal sponsorship category

must be sponsored by a Canadian citizen or permanent resident.

If you applied to sponsor spouse outside Canada, as the decision is made and sponsorship application is approved,

Canadian immigration authorities will issue the applicant Canada Spouse Visa (a confirmation of permanent residence).

If you are looking to apply for spousal sponsorship inside Canada, the application must processed first and once approved,

applicant’s status will change from temporary to permanent.

Spousal sponsorship within Canada gives an opportunity to person being sponsored and living in Canada to apply for an Open-Work Permit.

Spousal Sponsorship

One of the quickest ways to get your partner over to Canada is through the Spousal Sponsorship Category (part of Family Class immigration).

This is the best option for those who already have a spouse living in Canada or are married to a Canadian who is able to sponsor them for permanent residence.

If you want to Immigrate to Canada as a Couple, the Sponsor will need to first establish permanent residence in Canada through one of the many immigration programs available. Once the Sponsor has achieved permanent residence the application be made for sponsorship of a spouse, common-law partner, or conjugal partner. Immigrating with your partner as a dependent means you can both apply for permanent residency together.

Relationship Requirements
SpouseIn this case, the Sponsor and the Sponsored person are legally married. For marriage in Canada, a Certificate of marriage is required from the province where the marriage took place. Marriage outside of Canada must be lawful in the country where it took place as well as Canada. A same-sex marriage that took place outside of Canada can not be considered under this category but an application can be made under the other two.
Common-Law PartnerIn this category, the Sponsor and Sponsored person must cohabit consistently for a minimum of one year.
Conjugal PartnerThis category is for applicants who do not qualify under the other two categories for exceptional circumstances such as same-sex marriage restrictions in their country of origin or other immigration barriers. The Sponsor and Sponsored person must demonstrate a level of commitment (financial ties/emotional ties/joint assets) that spans the period of at least one year.

Sponsor Applicant Requirements

  • Sponsor must be at least 18 years of age
  • Be a Canadian permanent resident living in Canada/Canadian citizen
  • No criminal history
  • Cannot have been sponsored as a spouse within the last five years

Sponsored Applicant Requirements

If you have any more queries, you can ask your question in the forum of Canadians Live.

How to Apply to Universities in Canada

Canada

Canada’s provinces have very different entry requirements. We explore how to navigate the Canadian application process. Unsurprisingly for the one of largest countries in the world, Canada has a varied and complex university application system. When you want to apply to universities in Canada, it is not quite as hard to get your head around as its neighbor the USA, there are ten different provinces for students to navigate. Each province and each university will have subtly different admission requirements. 

But we’ll let you in on a secret. 

Once you understand how the Canadian university system works, it becomes much easier to strategize an application. 

To help your Y12/G11/IBDP students who may be considering  Canadian universities, it’s helpful to structure their research with three questions. 

  • How many provinces will you be applying to? 
  • Which (if any) application portals do these provinces use to process applications? 
  • What are the individual entry requirements for each university?

We can’t take you through the individual entry requirements of every Canadian university here. But we can give you a general breakdown of the different types of Canadian universities. 

The Different Types of University in Canada

Most universities in Canada are publicly funded through the provincial governments of Canada. However, there are also a number of private institutions and liberal arts colleges. It’s also worth noting that Canada has a host of vocational institutions – for example, colleges and polytechnics 

Public universities 

These institutions receive funding from the provincial, territorial, and/or federal government, although they do charge students tuition fees as well as accept private funding. People prefer these universities more when they apply to universities in Canada.

Examples of public universities in Canada

The University of Alberta, Simon Fraser University, Universite de Moncton. 

Private universities

A private university generally does not receive funding from the provincial, territorial or federal governments, instead of receiving private funding through donations from wealthy alumni and faculty research grants as well as traditional tuition fees.

Private universities often attract and retain the very best staff possessing esteemed reputations in their respective fields.

Examples of private universities in Canada

University Canada West, Crandall University 

Liberal arts colleges

Similar to their US counterparts, liberal arts colleges place a particular emphasis on undergraduate courses in the liberal arts, namely the humanities but also social, natural, and formal sciences. Many liberal arts institutions in Canada also fall into the category of private universities.

Examples of liberal arts colleges in Canada

St Francis Xavier University, Crandall University, Mount Allison University.

Colleges & polytechnic institutes

These are Canadian institutions offering a range of technical diplomas and applied degrees. It’s also worth noting that some Canadian universities also offer shorter diplomas and career-based programs. 

Examples of colleges & polytechnic institutes in Canada

Saskatchewan Institute of Applied Sciences and Technology, New Brunswick College of Craft and Design

Source :
bridgeu

If you have any more queries, you can ask your question in the forum of Canadians Live.

Immigrants contribute to the economy and create jobs for Canadians

Canada

The strength of Canada’s economy is measured in part by the number of people working (known as the labor force) and paying taxes to fund our public services, such as health care. Read more below about immigrants contribute to the economy and create jobs for Canadians.

Thanks to immigration, Canada’s labor force continues to grow by a small amount every year. If it weren’t for immigrants, employers would have trouble finding enough qualified workers to fill available jobs. This is because Canadians are living longer and having fewer children. More people are retiring, and there are fewer students in schools. As a result, the pool of Canadian-born existing and potential workers is limited.

Immigrants contribute to our economy, not only by filling gaps in our labor force and paying taxes but also by spending money on goods, housing, and transportation.

Supporting the aging population

Canada’s worker-to-retiree ratio is 4 to 1. By 2035, when 5 million Canadians are set to retire, the ratio will be down to 2 to 1, meaning there will be only 2 workers for every retiree.

Immigration alone cannot solve this challenge, but it can help as we look to keep our economy growing and maintain our commitments to health care, public pensions, and other social programs. More than 80% of the immigrants we’ve admitted in recent years are under 45 years old, meaning they will have plenty of working years in Canada.

Meeting our labor market needs

Some employers are already having trouble finding Canadian-born workers to fill jobs. More than 6 in 10 immigrants are selected for their positive impact on our economy. The top 5 occupations of people invited to immigrate under our Express Entry program are as follows:

  • software engineers and designers
  • information systems analysts
  • computer programmers
  • financial auditors and accountants
  • advertising, marketing and public relations professionals

Many immigrants have excellent science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) skills, and they make up about half of all STEM degree holders in Canada. These skills are important in our knowledge economy.

For immigrants to find work here, it’s important to make sure their education, training, and experience meet Canadian job standards. We are working with employers, provinces, and territories to make this happen as quickly as possible.

Immigrants can also fill labor market needs by taking on jobs that Canadians are not interested in doing. Proper knowledge is very necessary for the immigrants about how the immigrants contribute to the economy and create jobs for Canadians

Filling temporary labor needs

Temporary foreign workers are an important part of the Canadian workforce. They help employers meet labor needs when qualified Canadians or permanent residents aren’t available.

Temporary workers support the success and growth of many industries, such as agriculture and agri-food, health care, and technology.

In 2019, about 400,000 people were issued temporary work permitsFootnote1. Workers are thoroughly screened to protect the health, safety, and security of Canadians

Sustaining Canada’s education system through international students

International students contribute more than $21 billion to the economy every year through student spending and tuition. Their spending amounts to more than Canada’s exports of auto parts, lumber, or aircraftFootnote2.

International education is an essential pillar of Canada’s long-term competitiveness. Students from abroad who study in Canada expose Canadians to new cultures and ideas. This stimulates innovation and develops important cross-cultural competencies. If these students choose to immigrate to Canada, they contribute to Canada’s economic successFootnote3. In 2019, 827,586 international students held study permits in CanadaFootnote4, and more than 58,000 former international students immigrated permanently.

International students representFootnote5:

27% of all students enrolled in math, computer, and information sciences programs
19% of all students enrolled in architecture, engineering, and related programs
Many students in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics fields will stay and build their careers in Canada. They will help us build a stronger economy for the future.

Source: canada.ca

If you have any more queries, you can ask your question in the forum of Canadians Live.

WHAT IS A SOCIAL INSURANCE NUMBER (SIN) IN CANADA?

Canada

SOCIAL INSURANCE NUMBER (SIN) IN CANADA is the same as your Tax File Number in Australia, your Social Security Number in the USA or your Numéro de Sécurité Sociale en France.

If you are going to work in Canada, you will need a SIN to get paid.

How do I get a Social Insurance Number in Canada?

You will want to get this sorted as soon as you arrive in Canada. It is not difficult. The application form even comes with instructions!

You can pick the form up straight away at the airport when you arrive or in any Post Canada or Service Canada office.

Then it’s as simple as finding your nearest Service Canada office on arrival and dropping in the form.

Don’t forget to bring your passport and work permit to prove you are you. They will also ask for a permanent address, but you can use your place of work, a hostel, or a friend’s address if you don’t have one yet.

You will receive your SIN on the same day.

You should make sure to protect you SOCIAL INSURANCE NUMBER (SIN) IN CANADA. It’s a piece of paper that is very easy to lose, so don’t! Staple it into your passport, take a picture of it and email it to yourself, or keep it someplace secure.

Remember, you cannot receive your SIN online, so you will need to look after the paper copy. You can download and print the papers from the internet, but you cannot submit them electronically.

Who should apply for a SIN?

You may be wondering whether or not you need to apply for a SIN when you enter the country.

A Canadian citizen or a permanent resident will always be eligible to apply for a SIN.

However, this is not always the case for temporary residents – only Work Permit and Study Permit (if allowed to work) holders are eligible for a SIN.

A visitor to the country does not need to apply for a SIN.

Will I need a SIN to open a Canadian bank account?

The short answer to this is no.

Under the Income Tax Act, banks will ask you for your SIN when you open an interest-bearing account. However, other bank accounts can be opened without your SIN.

The SIN is one of a list of documents that you can use as evidence of identification when opening a Canadian bank account.

It’s not easy to get this back if you lose it. Your SIN will expire on the day that your visa expires.

What documents do I need to get my SIN?

You must provide original documents of what you are giving.

A primary document is an official document that proves your identity and status in Canada.

Canadian citizens must provide an original of one of the following:

  • Work permit
  • Study permit

How long will it take to receive my SIN?

Provided all goes well, you should receive your SIN number on the very same day you apply for it.

source: workingholidayincanada

If you have any more queries, you can ask your question in the forum of Canadians Live.